MindMatters helps Hunter School of the Performing Arts build a positive school community

 

 

Implementing MindMatters has helped staff members at the Hunter School of the Performing Arts align their wellbeing activities and build an inclusive and welcoming school community.  

The NSW school, which has about 1,158 K-12 students, offers a comprehensive curriculum with a performing arts specialty. It is the only public school in the state where entry is gained through an audition process. In addition, the school places a strong emphasis on student wellbeing and values education.
 
Deputy School Principal Marcus Neale, former School Principal Richard Jennings and Head Teacher of Welfare Janeanne Hardie, attended the leadership briefing delivered by Principals Australia Institute on February 2016. After attending the briefing, they presented MindMatters to fellow staff members during a whole-school development day. From the discussion, they saw how the framework could strengthen their existing wellbeing programs. They also saw how MindMatters could help their staff members understand and build a positive environment for promoting the mental health and wellbeing of their students. 
 
“We have a lot of kids that do not know each other as they travel long distances to get here to learn. We thought the kids didn’t have a sense of belonging, and needed the data to support the work we were doing to address issues such as these. MindMatters reflects what we already speak about at our school. It gets staff to think about how we can make a difference at a classroom level. It provides our teachers and staff with a better understanding about mental health, acceptance and tolerance, and how we need to model that behaviour in our school community with all of our students,” said Jennings who has recently retired. 
 
The school has started to implement MindMatters through a three-year plan. The staff and student surveys have been conducted and they are now analysing the results from the parent and carer surveys. Whole-school training in Component 3 modules has also started.
Jennings said that the MindMatters online tools have made it very efficient for whole-school professional learning to be delivered to their staff members. “The MindMatters resources fit into our professional learning structure and the key messages and principles presented through the materials are a reminder for staff of what to do to support student wellbeing,” Jennings stated.
 
Principals Australia Institute delivers MindMatters professional learning events and supports schools to implement the mental health and wellbeing initiative for secondary students.  To find out more, go here.
 
Implementing MindMatters has helped staff members at the Hunter School of the Performing Arts align their wellbeing activities and build an inclusive and welcoming school community.  
The NSW school, which has about 1,158 K-12 students, offers a comprehensive curriculum with a performing arts specialty. It is the only public school in the state where entry is gained through an audition process. In addition, the school places a strong emphasis on student wellbeing and values education.
 
Deputy School Principal Marcus Neale, former School Principal Richard Jennings and Head Teacher of Welfare Janeanne Hardie, attended the leadership briefing delivered by Principals Australia Institute on February 2016. After attending the briefing, they presented MindMatters to fellow staff members during a whole-school development day. From the discussion, they saw how the framework could strengthen their existing wellbeing programs. They also saw how MindMatters could help their staff members understand and build a positive environment for promoting the mental health and wellbeing of their students. 
 
“We have a lot of kids that do not know each other as they travel long distances to get here to learn. We thought the kids didn’t have a sense of belonging, and needed the data to support the work we were doing to address issues such as these. MindMatters reflects what we already speak about at our school. It gets staff to think about how we can make a difference at a classroom level. It provides our teachers and staff with a better understanding about mental health, acceptance and tolerance, and how we need to model that behaviour in our school community with all of our students,” said Jennings who has recently retired. 
 
The school has started to implement MindMatters through a three-year plan. The staff and student surveys have been conducted and they are now analysing the results from the parent and carer surveys. Whole-school training in Component 3 modules has also started.
Jennings said that the MindMatters online tools have made it very efficient for whole-school professional learning to be delivered to their staff members. “The MindMatters resources fit into our professional learning structure and the key messages and principles presented through the materials are a reminder for staff of what to do to support student wellbeing,” Jennings stated.
 
Principals Australia Institute delivers MindMatters professional learning events and supports schools to implement the mental health and wellbeing initiative for secondary students.  To find out more, go here.